Cape Horn Loop Hike

Originally posted on Evergreen Hiker:

Forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair.”  ~Kahlil Gibran

Cape Horn hike viewpoint

With high cliff views of the Columbia River Gorge from the Washington side, the Cape Horn Loop Trail is a 6.8 mile loop that meanders through the woods to pop out points with wide open views of the river. Maintained by an active trail association, the Cape Horn loop is clean and clear making it a popular hike for outdoor lovers of all ages.

The lower portion of the Cape Horn trail is closed annually from February 1-July 15 to protect sensitive Peregrine Falcon habitat, so if you visit during this time frame make sure to save time to return on the trail to the parking lot.

Getting there: From Portland take I-5 or I-205 north to WA SR-14 east to milepost 26, turn left on Salmon…

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Everest Base Camp Training Guide

Originally posted on Evergreen Hiker:

With the big trek to Everest base camp ahead of me – by golly – am I preparing both my body and mind as much as possible for the trek. My no means, do I want to be the one person who is miserable for the trip just because I wasn’t strong enough to train. With only two months to go, I’m getting serious now.

To prepare, my training plan combines P90X daily workouts with a half-marathon training plan plus long distance hikes on the weekend and stretching.

(I am not a certified trainer, please consult a trainer or physician before starting this workout regime.)

Training Plan

Day

P90X

Running

Monday Core 3 – 5 mile run
Tuesday Cardio walk, 30-60 minutes cross train
Wednesday Shoulders & Arms, Abs 3 – 5 mile run
Thursday Yoga walk, 30-60 minutes cross train
Friday Legs & Back, Abs Hill run…

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Everest or Bust!

Originally posted on Evergreen Hiker:

In 2 months and 22 days, I will be set out on the adventure of a lifetime.

With two strong feet forward, I am going to trek to Everest Base Camp with Ace the Himalayas and my best friend. A 16-day round trip, we will hike the 40 miles to the highest mountain in the world (from Lukia to Everest BC) and enjoy daily visits to cultural sites, traditional villages and tea houses. Walking alongside mountaineers heading up for their attempt at the summit, the experience I imagine will be surreal and breathtaking – literally and figuratively.

I’m not yet sure where else this trip will take me, but I do know for sure that it represents a new direction and new path for my life. I will be leaving behind my job, my apartment and my comfort zone in Portland, Oregon and setting forth on the trail.

“It is not…

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A Fiery Fall on the Eagle Creek Trail

As cool weather settles into Oregon and fog hangs on the banks for the Columbia River Gorge, the Eagle Creek Trail illuminates in the fiery tones of fall. Following its colorful path – especially against the evergreen backdrop and contrasting grey sky – I savored and soaked in the mists of the new hiking season.

Eagle Creek

This recreation area featuring several routes of various lengths is a popular hiking spot for locals all summer long. However, once the crowds hunker down inside for Oregon’s rainy season, the true beauty of this trail unwraps.

With springs of water showering down, the trail follows the rugged cliff banks of Eagle Creek past several beautiful waterfalls. Perfect for all ages and abilities (unless you’re afraid of heights), this trail remains relatively flat as it weaves along the cascading river.

Lower Punch Bowl Falls

The first few miles of the trail lead hikers past Metlako Falls, Punchbowl Falls and Loowit Falls to High Bridge. Crossing the deep cut Gorge, the bridge serves up views of the sheer, carving power of water.

Punch Bowl Falls

With leaves of crimson and yellow lining the path through the lush rainforest, six miles into the hike, the trail reaches Tunnel Falls. About midway up the span of the waterfall, a passageway is carved behind the tumbling water. Created in 1910, the tunnel transports hikers along the amphitheater of cliffs for more spectacular view of this amazing water.

Tunnel Falls

Tunnel Falls

To complete the hike to Tunnel Falls (with time for photography stops) give yourself at least 2.5-3 hours each way. If you do go in the fall or winter, be prepared with a good rain coat and backpack cover because even if it is not raining from the sky, the cliffs spray down plenty of water to get you equally as wet.

Driving directions:

Follow I-84 for 45 minutes east from Portland to exit #41. At the bottom of the ramp turn right on Eagle Creek Lane. Go about 1/2 mile to the end of the road to park at the trail head.

Getting Muddy at Tough Mudder

With mud from my toes to my nose and sloshing through my shoes, I waded through waist deep mud and over heaps of slippery dirt with only one thing on my mind, finishing. Exhaustion setting in and my knees splitting from an old injury…and falling on my face around mile 5, the cold mud for once in the course felt oddly and momentarily refreshing. “We are almost there,” I thought as I sludged my mud-caked Nikes out of the pit. But as two of my teammates pulled me out of the pond of goop and I hobbled (broken pirate style) around the last bend, there it was…the mountain of all obstacles – literally. Everest, a greased half-pipe, and Electroshock therapy, dangling electrified wires, were the last two obstacles that stood in my way. “Bring it on!”

Dubbed as one of the toughest obstacle course races, the Tough Mudder is an intense 11-mile, 25 obstacle race. Designed by British Special Forces to test your strength, stamina, mental grit and camaraderie, the course has you climbing walls, swimming through fields of mud, squirming under barbed (and sometimes electrified) wire, running almost a marathon and dunking your body into ice tanks, among other things. It’s a race that gives you the opportunity to prove yourself, not only to your teammates and the other competitors but also to yourself, that you truly are tough enough – or just crazy enough!

The highlights of the Tough Mudder, Las Vegas race for me were:

  • Kiss of mud – crawling under barbed wire through muddy water
  • Arctic Enema – a quick dip into ice-cold (and I mean ice-cold) water.
  • Funky Monkey – a monkey bar challenge that brought me back to the good old days on the play ground
  • The Wounded Warrior run – I hopped a free ride on a random dude’s back for half of it!
  • Berlin Walls – scaling 3 sets of wooden walls that progressively got taller
  • And of course, Everest. It took me four very painful attempts to grab my teammates’ hands, but I did successfully scale the half-pipe.

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Check out all the obstacles here and our race day video here.

However, when they say that Tough Mudder is a race that you can’t finish alone – nor would you want to – they mean it. The best part about competing in this race was running it with my co-workers. The camaraderie, support and energy everyone brought to the course made the event. From running buddies to helpful boosts over the obstacles, my co-workers and all the other competitors are what got me through the race, up the walls, through the mud and across the finish line. (Plus it’s amazing what a little peer pressure and a bunch of stubbornness will get you through as well!)

Are you tough enough?