Getting My Hippie On at the Oregon Country Fair

The 90s may be alive and well in Portland but two hours south in Eugene, Oregon the 60s are flourishing like a flower child. From tie dye, tattooed and topless to forest fairies and free-spirit skippers, the hippie in everyone comes crawling out of the closet for three days each summer at the Oregon Country Fair.

Oregon Country Fair enterance

In as bohemian of garb as I could gather (and feel comfortable in), I wandered through the looping forest paths. Lined with moss-cover huts filled with vendors, delicious local foods and colorful crafts, the fair grounds unwound through the lush green fields just 15 minutes east of Eugene in a fantasy splendor like Narnia’s version of the red carpet.

Dandelion people

To my right a half-cheetah with devil horns growled by and then to the left a couple of bloomed dandelions strolled hand-in-hand. Hardly able to wipe the grin from my face out of pure joy, I dizzily walked the festival and simply enjoyed getting lost and people watching. Traveling the same route several times without even realizing the similarities, I’d zigzagged through the crowds pulled by my curiosity to view art tucked in nooks and crannies or to stop to listen to a rousing concert by a vagabond musical tribe.

Band

A phantasmagoria of sights, smells and smiles – I have never experienced such a varied festival – or a more welcoming one. Each character at the Oregon Country Fair strutted their stuff like a true individual and showed no fear to standing out.

Combining music, the arts and a whole lot of free-spirit, the Oregon Country Fair celebrates acceptance with endless free hugs. Its a place where anyone – and I mean anyone – can get there hippy on.

Pulling everyone together – the 100% daily hippies, families and even a Hurley clad bro –  the Oregon Country Fair offers free hugs to difference.

Not Your Paint By Numbers Art Scene

Numberism Art by Sienna Morris

Over the past few weeks, I have had the pleasure of traveling to Portland, Oregon a handful of times and exploring the city’s thriving arts scene. From live theater performances to art walks, café concerts and plays, Portland houses hippies to hipsters and everyone inbetween for an unforgettably creative gallery for the arts. One of my favorite art vendors to stop by is the huge, eclectic Portland Saturday Market along the Willamette River. Featuring hand-made goods, jewelry, paintings, glass art, ceramics and so much more, the market is a wonderful showcase opportunity for all the local artist.

On my most recent trip to the Portland Saturday Market, my friends and I stumbled upon the most amazing booth – Fleeting States Studios by Sienna Morris– where we all made an thorough donation.

Using numbers to build images frozen in time, Sienna Morris creates numberism art that evokes emotion and aww in its imaginative projects – this is no simple kids’ paint by number.

Each image is created using only numbers and each string is painstakingly thought out to represent the mathematical, scientific or numerical representation of the image. The amount of thought and precision that goes into each creation just blows my mind.

The most extraordinary piece that I viewed in Sienna’s booth was her creation called “A Cello.” The strings are drawn with the hertz frequency along the notes, the wood of the bow is drawn with the Pythogorean comma and the body of the cello with the speed at which sound travels parallel to the grain of wood! View this amazing work of art here.

Falling to Pieces by Sienna Morris

Falling to Pieces by Sienna Morris

Sienna created her first drawing in 2008 titled “Falling to Pieces.”  My friend Sarah purchased a reproduction of this moment frozen in time, which is built using the numbers of the clock, 1-12. The image represents a moment in time that is precious and intimate, yet quickly disappears like the numbers falling away from the two faces.

Midnight by Sienna Morris

Midnight Special by Sienna Morris

Bioluminescences by Sienna Morris

Bioluminescences by Sienna Morris

My friend Dani purchased for her sister, the piece titled “Bioluminescence.” This drawing is much more complex then the first. The fireflies’ abdomens are drawn with a chemical formula for their bioluminescence, while the light coming from the fireflies is drawn with the speed of light (299792458 meters per second). The girl is drawn with the numbers of the clock, 1-12 to represent the moment in time.

My friend Bre bought from the booth’s display, a piece titled “Midnight Special,” which depicts a Billie Holiday-esque image of a young lady holding an old fashion microphone. This image is also created with the numbers 1-12 as part of her time collection.

Finally, I purchased the beautiful intro piece, “Et Memorium.”

I highly recommend stopping by Sienna Morris’ booth at the Saturday Market or viewing her collections online.

Twelve hours in Washington D.C.

With dozens of monuments, museums, flourishing neighborhoods, delicious restaurants and abundant history, Washington D.C. is a tourist heaven. And to see all that Washington D.C. has to offer, a half-day doesn’t even cut it close, but let’s be realistic – who can take off two weeks to explore the nation’s capitol inch my inch. (though I want to go back and do just that!)

On my most recent trip I only had 12 hours including commuting time to make the most of the big city. Here is how I spent my time: Continue reading